Poetry Tuesday

Poetry Activity: Acrostic Poem

Interested in poetry?
Write an acrostic poem using this activity for kids, adults, and everyone in-between!

 

A. Choose a word for your poem
Pick a word. It could be your name, but if your name is either super short or super long, you might want to choose a different word. For the sake of this example, I’ll choose my last name: Spuler

B. Write your word
Now write your word vertically (up and down) on your page, starting at the top and going down:

S
P
U
L
E
R

C. Write your poem!
Now think of words that start with the letter on each line. Try to use words that describe or relate to the word you chose. I chose my last name, so I’ll describe my family:

Spirited
Poetic
Unique
Loving
Expressive
Resourceful

D. Share your Poem in the comments or on my Facebook page, or…

E. Try this challenge!
Make an acrostic poem with the word SUNSHINE, except this time change the location of the words. For example….

                Simmering
              fUn
shines oN my face
      BurnS
              H
I
N
E

Pleased with your poem? Share it in the comments or post it on my Facebook page so we can all read and enjoy them!

 

Hungry for more? Check out this week’s…

Poem Study:  The Sun Has Set by Emily Jane Brontë, or Bed in Summer by Robert Louis Stevenson

Advanced Poetry Lesson: Ballads

 

Poetry Tuesday

Poetry Tuesday! July 17

Hello! Welcome to Poetry Tuesday: the day we dip (or dive) into the lovely world of poetry!

Each Tuesday from June 19 to August 21, 2018, I’ll share a Poetry Activity, a Poem Study, plus an Advanced Poetry Lesson. Feel free to enjoy one, two, or all three of these fun resources! (Click on the title links)

Poetry Activity (for kids, adults, and everyone in between): Alliteration Poem

Poem Study: Bear in There, by Shel Silverstein

Advanced Poetry Lesson: Ballads, (Week 1 of 2)

Poetry Tuesday

Poetry Tuesday

Poetry Activity: Alliteration Poem

Interested in poetry?
Learn about alliteration using this poetry activity for kids, adults, and everyone in-between!

sun
(photo credit: Hannah Spuler)

A. Introduction to Alliteration:
Have you ever tried to say a tongue-twister? Can you say this one?

She sells seashells by the seashore.

Think it’s difficult to say this singularly silly saying?

When two or more words start with the same letter or sound, it’s called an alliteration.
(I just adore amazing alliterations! Don’t you?)

Here are some more examples:

1. Alexander the armadillo ate absolutely amazing apples and ants.
2. Beehives buzz and babies blow bubbles.
3. Caroline cried because she couldn’t catch cantaloupes.
4. Daryl didn’t do anything daring, did he?

These are silly examples, but alliteration can also be used beautifully in poetry to make it sing.

B. A Sunny Alliteration Poem
Our activity today will use alliterations to write a poem about the sun.

  1. Write down all the words you can think of that have to do with the sun. For example:
    hot
    big
    shines
    beautiful
    etc.
    Bonus points if you think of “s” words!
  2. Now see if any of those sun words can be changed to a word that starts with “s.” For example, the word “hot” can become “simmering,” and the word “beautiful” can become “spectacular.” Change as many as you can without help.
  3. (optional) Now see if you can change even more by using a thesaurus!
    What’s a thesaurus?? A thesaurus is a big book full of words that helps you find a different word that means the same thing. If I wanted to find another word for hot, I would look it up in my thesaurus and I might find words like scorching, sizzling, or boiling. If you don’t have a thesaurus on your bookshelf, you can use an online thesaurus. Type in your word and see what you find!
    http://www.thesaurus.com/
  4. Okay, do you have your list of s words that have to do with the sun?
    It might look a little like this:


    hot               
    scorching, sizzling
    beautiful    spectacular, superb, stunning
    big               substantial

     

  5. Now we write the poem!
    A few notes:

    ~This poem doesn’t have to rhyme or have a meter. It can just be free-form (See my example if that didn’t make sense. Notice how my poem doesn’t rhyme?)

    ~In this kind of poem, the first word of each line does not have to be capitalized. Use capital letters the way you would use them in a normal sentence.

    ~Each line can have one word, or many words. Play with the spacing! You have complete freedom.

    ~Not every word has to begin with “s.” If you need a few extra words to tie it together, that’s okay!

     

  6. Below is an example of what your poem could look like. Mine is pretty short, having used a short word list, but feel free to make yours longer! You could make it silly, super simple, or more serious. Experiment with different groups of words too. The sky’s the limit!


Sun
Spectacular,
striking,
sizzling,
stunning,
shining on
my skin,
shining in
my soul—
sun.
~Hannah Spuler

Pleased with your poem? Share it in the comments or post it on my Facebook page so we can all read and enjoy them!

 

Hungry for more? Check out this week’s…

Poem Study: Bear in There, by Shel Silverstein

Advanced Poetry Lesson: Ballads, (Week 1 of 2)

 

Fun List Mondays

Fun List Monday, July 16

What are 4 Feelings You’ve Felt in the Last Week?

Have you been encouraged lately? Sad? Angry? Embarrassed? Tickled Silly? Our brains work hard every day to help us feel and experience the world. Sometimes it helps to name the emotions we experience and even share them with others. As someone who used to struggle to express my emotions, I understand how important it is. So let’s share! How have you been feeling in the last week?

edit feelings IMG_1093 copy

Write a list with me! Every Monday I will post a fun list. Fill out your list and enjoy it by yourself, share it on my Facebook page or on Twitter (with the hashtag #FunListMondays). Not convinced? Read about how lists encourage better writing here.

Like this activity? See other Fun List Mondays here!

Poetry Tuesday

Poetry Activity: Fill-in-the-Blank Poem

Interested in poetry?
Combine rhyme and meter using this fill-in-the-blank poetry activity for kids, adults, and everyone in-between!

fill in the blank poem

A. Review: Rhyme

Remember the lesson about rhyming?
These are examples of words that rhyme:

stop, hop, lop, plop

Need a refresher on rhyming? Click here.

B. Review: Meter

Remember the lesson about meter?
Here are two lines that have four beats, or stresses:

Twinkle, Twinkle, little star,
How I wonder what you are.

Need a refresher on meter? Click here.

C. Fill-in-the-blank poem

Below is a fill-in-the-blank poem where the basic idea and structure is there and you get to fill in the blanks! This poem has a strong meter as well as an AABB rhyme scheme (lines 1 and 2 rhyme with each other and lines 3 and 4 rhyme). If the word is at the end of the line, make sure you keep the rhyme scheme. Give it a try!

(Title)

My       (noun)       is/are cold
And my       (noun)       is/are old.
My       (noun)       is/are hot
But my       (noun)       is/are not.

My      (noun)       is/are blue,
My      (noun)       too,
But not my       (noun)     ,
Because it’s/they’re       (noun)        .

I have a       (noun)       
And he/she/it has a      (noun)      .
I/We        (verb)       outside
But I/we        (verb)       inside.

My      (noun)        is tall,
My      (noun)        is small,
And that is all,
My friend.

The End.

 

Simplified definitions:
Noun: a person, place, thing, or idea
Verb: an action word


Hungry for more? Check out this week’s…

Poem Study: The Brook, by Alfred Lord Tennyson

Advanced Poetry Lesson: Odes, Week 2

 

Poetry Tuesday

Poetry Activity: Write Your Own Nursery Rhymes!

Interested in poetry?
Combine rhyme and meter using this activity for kids, adults, and everyone in-between.

nursery rhymes

A. Introduction: Nursery Rhymes
Can you finish this phrase?

Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall,
Humpty Dumpty had a great—

Did you get it??
Okay, now how about this one?

Jack be nimble, Jack be quick,
Jack jump over the candle—

And this one?

Little Boy Blue, come blow your horn,
The cow’s in the meadow, the sheep in the—

How did you do?
If you grew up with nursery rhymes, you probably could have filled in all those missing words in your sleep, and even recited the rest of the rhyme. If you grew up speaking English, chances are, you knew at least one of those nursery rhymes.

You also probably knew that nursery rhymes were made for children. But have you ever stopped to think about why they are so easy to remember?

Any guesses?
(Drumroll please…)

They rhyme! (Probably why they’re called nursery rhymes.) Take the first example…

Jack be nimble, Jack be quick,
Jack jump over the candlestick.

They also have a simple meter:

Jack be nimble, Jack be quick,
Jack jump over the candle stick.

(Not quite sure you understand? Look at these past lessons: rhyme, meter)

B. Write your own nursery rhyme!
Let’s use some classic nursery rhymes and change them slightly to make them into new poems! During this activity, watch for the rhyming words and the meter!

  1. Read the poem
  2. Fill in the blanks to change the meaning and make it as silly (or serious) as you like
  3. Make sure you keep the beat (stresses) the same as the original poem or may end up sounding a bit funny!

Original:
Hey Diddle Diddle, the cat and the fiddle,
The cow jumped over the moon.
The little dog laughed to see such a sight
And the dish ran away with the spoon!

Fill in the blanks to write your own poem!
Hey Diddle Diddle, the _______ and the fiddle
The __________ jumped over the moon
The little __________ laughed to see such a sight
And the __________ ran away with the spoon

Original: 
Mary, Mary, quite contrary, how does your garden grow?
With silver bells and cockle shells, and little maids all in a row.

Fill in the blanks to write your own poem!
________ _________
, quite contrary, how does your ________ grow?
With silver ________ and
_________  ________, and little _________ all in a row.

Pleased with your poem? Share it in the comments or post it on my Facebook page so we can all read and enjoy them!

C. Extra Challenge: A Nursery Rhyme From Scratch
To write a nursery rhyme, come up with either:
1. A lesson to teach children (aka, How to Count, or Why Kids should Eat Their Veggies) or
2. A simplified story from history  (aka, The Noble Duke of York)

See if you can come up with four lines of the poem, where the first two lines rhyme and the second two rhyme. See what you can create, and don’t forget to share!

Hungry for more? Check out this week’s…

Poem Study: My Shadow, by Robert Louis Stevenson

Advanced Poetry Lesson: Odes (Week 1 of 2)

 

Blog

Summer Writing Activities Are Here!

Summer Writing Activities

Looking for fun writing activities for kids, adults, and everyone in between?  You’ve come to the right place! I’ve spent hours of inside, outside, on-the-bed, under-the-covers, at-the-kitchen-counter time crafting a set of daily writing activities for the Summer, starting June 18 and ending September 3, 2018. I’m not sure what’s more exciting, the fact that they’re all free, or the enjoyment of working on them together! (Note: Have little ones? Read about how to include them in writing activities here.)

What do I have in store? An activity for every weekday for twelve weeks starting today. Pick and choose or do them all!

Fun List Monday

Fun List Mondays- Write a list with me! Every Monday I will post a fun list. For example: Five Foods I Like and One I Don’t. Fill out your list and enjoy it by yourself, share it in the comments, on my Facebook page, or on Twitter (with the hashtag #FunListMondays). Not convinced? Read about how lists encourage better writing here.

Poetry Tuesday

Poetry Tuesdays- Dip (or dive) into the lovely world of poetry! Each Tuesday, I’ll share a fun poetry activity plus a poem study for all ages, as well as an advanced poetry lesson for ages 14 and up. Enjoy one, two, or all three of guided resources.

 

Freewrite Wednesdays

Freewrite Wednesdays- Grab a pencil, a piece of paper, and a timer and see if you can put the stuff in your head down on the page! Each week I’ll have a freewrite topic to get you started, as well as prompt questions in case you get stuck.

 

Furry Thursday chipmunk

Furry Thursdays- Smash up science and English parts of speech together with this guessing game! Each week I’ll share a group of nouns, adjectives, and verbs plus a biome or two. Players will guess the animal based on the words. When you’re finished guessing, draw the animal and the words for drawing and copy-work practice.

Friday Story Share

Friday Story Share- Ready to share your stories? Write a story, send it in by Thursday at midnight and I will draw one out of the pot to share on the Story Share section of the website the following Friday!

Join in the fun! Fill your summer with the joy of writing.